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Tuning down compound draw weight

Question:

I purchased a Hoyt Banshee for my oldest son that needs to be tuned down in draw weight. I know to do both limbs equally, but I’m getting a little nervous because I have backed out the allen screws 4 full turns & I don’t want to back out too far & have the limbs detach. Question: Do the allen-bolts have a stop so that I cant back-out too far? (I need to reduce the draw some more and I have 5/16" limb-riser-gap right now.) I don’t have a pro-shop to go to in my area. Sincerely nervous, — Bruce.

Response:

> I purchased a Hoyt Banshee for my oldest son that needs > to be tuned down in draw weight. I know to do both limbs > equally, but I’m getting a little nervous because I have backed >out the allen screws 4 full turns & I don’t want to back out too > far & have the limbs detach. > Question: Do the allen-bolts have a stop so that I cant > back-out too far? (I need to reduce the draw some more and > I have 5/16" limb-riser-gap right now.) I don’t have a pro-shop > to go to in my area.

The allen bolts do NOT have a stop. If you keep undoing them, eventually the thing will just spring apart. I think you can take a Banshee up to 5 full turns and still have enough to shoot on. See if you can find some fishing scales – they go up to about 100# for those ambitious people and draw the bow with them. This will give you an idea of draw weight, and thus how far you have left to go before Bad Things (TM) happen. 7om

Response:

I know very little about compound bow adustments, but is it really safe to adjust a limb under tension like that when you don’t know for sure where the "oops" point is?   I understand that such a bow has a lot of stored energy, that if released while you are working on it, can be fatal. (and didn’t someone very well know in Britain suffer demise as a result of a cable loosing unexpectedly  while in a press on a compound?)   I would counsel taking this bow to a shop rather than seeking to loosen the bolts when you are unsure of how many turns you have left.  If that is out of the question, I would FIRST tighten down the bolt as far as possible, and then back off  from this "known" starting point while I was NOT over the bow, but to the side or even below.  Being a prudent person, (ie, coward)  I would also probably crouch down under the kitchen table while  I  reach around the top to unscrew it.<G>   Use a video camera or a mirror or something to see how many turns I’m backing it off. <RBG> TexARC bravado: – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->I purchased a Hoyt Banshee for my oldest son that needs >to be tuned down in draw weight. I know to do both limbs >equally, but I’m getting a little nervous because I have backed >out the allen screws 4 full turns & I don’t want to back out too >far & have the limbs detach. >Question: Do the allen-bolts have a stop so that I cant >back-out too far? (I need to reduce the draw some more and >I have 5/16" limb-riser-gap right now.) I don’t have a pro-shop >to go to in my area. >The allen bolts do NOT have a stop. If you keep undoing them, eventually the >thing will just spring apart. I think you can take a Banshee up to 5 full >turns and still have enough to shoot on. See if you can find some fishing >scales – they go up to about 100# for those ambitious people and draw >the bow with them. This will give you an idea of draw weight, and thus how >far you have left to go before Bad Things (TM) happen. >7om

Response:

For a compound with good cables.  The cables will hold the bow together in event of catastrophic limb failure.  I’ve seen compounds break on the firing line.  They fold up and drop straight down in a heap.  As the limb bolts are backed out the pressure on the limbs are decreasing so when and if the bolts pop out it won’t be with a lot of force.  I would mark the limbs, unstring the bow, and back a limb bolt out to see where you are.  It used to be one turn equals 2

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