Sport Archery » Archery » tuning

tuning

Question:

>Hi everyone … >Up till now I’ve been tuning my accoustic guitar using some recording of >someone playing each cord. >Recently I’ve discovered some songs I’d like to learn that say stuff like >’the song is in drop D tuning". >How can I get to tune my guitar that way ? >I could help myself with the piano but I dunno how… >thanks for your help …

If you look at a piano, you will notice the black keys have this pattern: three in a row, a little step, two in a row, a little step and back to three in a row etc the D is the white key between the two black keys in the two black key group. just tune the lowest string, the low e, the sixth string, the closest to your nose, the farthest from the ground, the bass string to D

Response:

These posts all made it fairly confused. Starting out with a normal tune, tune the lowest string to be one octave below, but the same note, as the third lowest string. E->D.

Response:

Hi everyone … Up till now I’ve been tuning my accoustic guitar using some recording of someone playing each cord. Recently I’ve discovered some songs I’d like to learn that say stuff like ‘the song is in drop D tuning". How can I get to tune my guitar that way ? I could help myself with the piano but I dunno how… thanks for your help …

Response:

I’m a newbie so someone correct me if I’m wrong… but my friend showed me last night that you do it by taking the 4th string from the bottom of your guitar (A) and tuning it until it sounds like D, and then work your tuning down from there. Did I get it right? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hi everyone … > Up till now I’ve been tuning my accoustic guitar using some recording of > someone playing each cord. > Recently I’ve discovered some songs I’d like to learn that say stuff like > ‘the song is in drop D tuning". > How can I get to tune my guitar that way ? > I could help myself with the piano but I dunno how… > thanks for your help …

Response:

No, you didn’t get it right.  Hang your head in shame!! Basically you tune the low E [6] down to an octave below the D [4] – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> I’m a newbie so someone correct me if I’m wrong… but my friend showed me > last night that you do it by taking the 4th string from the bottom of your > guitar (A) and tuning it until it sounds like D, and then work your tuning > down from there. > Did I get it right? > Hi everyone … > Up till now I’ve been tuning my accoustic guitar using some recording of > someone playing each cord. > Recently I’ve discovered some songs I’d like to learn that say stuff like > ‘the song is in drop D tuning". > How can I get to tune my guitar that way ? > I could help myself with the piano but I dunno how… > thanks for your help …

Response:

translation= tune the low 6th string down until it sounds like a chord when played with the 5th string…. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > No, you didn’t get it right.  Hang your head in shame!! > Basically you tune the low E [6] down to an octave below the D [4] > I’m a newbie so someone correct me if I’m wrong… but my friend showed me > last night that you do it by taking the 4th string from the bottom of your > guitar (A) and tuning it until it sounds like D, and then work your tuning > down from there. > Did I get it right? > > Hi everyone … > > Up till now I’ve been tuning my accoustic guitar using some recording of > > someone playing each cord. > > Recently I’ve discovered some songs I’d like to learn that say stuff > like > > ‘the song is in drop D tuning". > > How can I get to tune my guitar that way ? > > I could help myself with the piano but I dunno how… > > thanks for your help …

Response:

If am after as much tuning information as I can get besides the bare shaft and paper methods

Response:

- Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> If am after as much tuning information as I can get besides the bare shaft > and paper methods > There is also the walk back method (which I feel is the best of the >bunch) >wPm >– > S&B Enterprises     Sunland,CA. 91040

Could you please explain this "walk back method?" Thankyou

Response:

> Could you please explain this "walk back method?"

Try [http://www4.gvsu.edu/triert/archery/tuning.htm] for an overview. Greetings, — Stef — Stefan Berner                        Requirements Eng. Research Group http://www.ifi.unizh.ch/staff/berner.html   Univ. Zurich, Switzerland

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

Hello, I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. Doug

Response:

you can tune to the harmonics at the 12th fret just like you do with your guitar (it’s the same tuning interval, etc. for 4 string EADG from lowest to highest… you can also experiment with alternative tunings!).  When you get used to tuning, you can just tune the G string at the 12th fret harmonic and use harmonics at the 5th and 7th frets to tune the rest of the strings… works good in a hurry on stage, etc…. cleve – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

The harmonic on the fifth fret of the E string should match the harmonic of the 7th fret of the A string, and so on 5th fret of string should match 7th fret of next highest string. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >Hello, >I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have >just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 >string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks >etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and >I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. >Doug

Response:

> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks.

The bass is tuned like the bottom four strings (E, A, D, G) of your six-string guitar except one (or is it two?) octaves lower.  Your guitar tuner will probably work, but you’ll probably have to use the 12th (or 5th) fret harmonics to make it track. So is it one octave down or two?  I’ve never known for sure. Wheat comp.uark.edu/~jemartin/bassbook.html | A Resource for Electric Bassists

Response:

Whats up In case your curious the bass is tuned in Fouths. Mainly EADG. Iff your guitar is tuned Properly then the bottom Four strings of the guitar and the four strings of the bass will sound the same open notes. Only the bass will be lower by an octave. Hope this helps Later Matt

Response:

most telephone dailtones are, or are close to: A.                                                         danceon…toratora – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hello, > I have been playing the 6 string electric guitar for some time and have > just recently taken up bass playing.  Can anyone tell me how to tune a 4 > string bass in regular tuning without the aid of a tuner or forks > etc….. harmonics & stuff (I have a tuner but it is for an electric and > I’m not sure that it will work with the sound it will produce..) thanks. > Doug

Response:

>with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy

What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? Edward G. ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Try this, tune to your E reference then tune the rest of your strings by ear. Now borrow a tuner and see how far off you are on each string. Now decide if this level of error is acceptible to you. P.S. : If your playing in a band set up with say 2 guitarists and they are also using this tuning method then multiply your error by 3. This can very quickly start to sound like a big mess. Splurge the extra $20.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for >reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret

Does anybody remember the "Chico and The Man" episode where Freddie Prinze was learning to play guitar?…..His 5th fret tuning attempts were hilarious…. Hawkeye

Response:

I bet it’s easier to distinguish the higher notes.  Problem is, usually once you adjust the lowest string, you need to go back and re-check the others. The E or B can bend the neck enough to put the "whammy" on dem little strings. —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->with tuning, you >will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G >(or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to >that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) >fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string >and going up on the 5th fret. >my bit of advice > – the pig guy > What’s the thinking behind this?  Why would it work better? > Edward G. > ‘It’s not a gang; it’s a club.’

Response:

Get the tuner! Your ears should get used to A-440, it’s hard to develope an ear if your refrerence point keeps changing.                                Aloha, Jerry

Response:

Got together with a friend of mine not too long ago. Played together for the first time. My friend didn’t use a tuner. Says he doesn’t need that shit. I think it has something to do with; He’s too good of a musician for one. He was out of tune and swore he was in tune and I’m the mental one. When he walked away, I checked his guitar with my tuner. Whoa! Talk about off. I can’t play with him anymore. In search of a new guitarist because he’s too set in his ways.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

>Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner?

$20 fer tuner?  Dat be one dem fancy-ass Albacore. —  -rob "penguin sent out for cleanin"

Response:

a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. Your mileage may vary —  -rob    O>  /()   ^^

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

I’ve had mine for over 10 years. It still has the origonal battery, and still works.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> a $20 tuner is not worth anything by MY experience.  Broke in 2 months. > Your mileage may vary > — >  -rob >    O> >  /() >   ^^ > Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. > And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

nah don’t get a tuner, if you have reference to an E, you should be fine. Unless of course, you’re planning on gigging, then it might come in handy, depending what your band decides to tune to.  My band, however, tunes differently each time we play, we just make sure we’re in tune with each other.  It works fine, as our singer can handle it well and has a good ear. Recently they’ve been tuning to me, so I’ve been trying to weed out that annoying dropping to D and then another half step across all strings….gets kind of annoying.  The reasoning is that its more full, heavier sounding and not many people do it.  I think its a stupid gimmick, but I don’t like drop d either. anyways, good luck Beau

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Hey, i don’t have a tuner, and i’m always out of tune… if someone gave me one for free i’d be like ‘aw cool, thanx’ but $20 for one??? well ok…tuner? or drinks after a gig…hmmm HARD CHOICE!!! Depends what sort of work environment your working in. And with tuning, you will find you’ll probably find to get more accurate tuning by tuning the G (or C or whatever the top string of your bass) and then tuning the rest to that by playing the 7th fret harmonic, and comparing it to the 5th (or 12th) fret harmonic on the string below rather than tuning from the bottom string and going up on the 5th fret. my bit of advice  - the pig guy

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

You obviously don’t NEED one since tuners as we know them today have only been on the market about 20 years. People have tuned by ear for hundreds of years, eh? You didn’t say much about your situation, but tuners do make life a lot easier if you are doing gigs. If you are playing by yourself at home, who cares. —                                                    Brian Rost                                                   Stargen, Inc.

Response:

> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Three points: 1) Nothing looks more unprofessional than saying "hey man, give me an E" 2) I once saw a band tune to the song playing on the jukebox.  They started out, the singer came in and sounded just awful.  Yep, the band tuned to a song that was tuned normal pitch and they usually tune down a half-step. 3) If you have to ask if it’s worth getting a tuner, you need a tuner. Adam

Response:

Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

Try it. You’ll like it. There great for tuning in a noisy room, or when a room must remain quiet, or when you don’t have a keyboard handy or when… oh hell, all the time. To set intonation, you just need to match your 12th fret note with the octave harmonic. move the bridge up or down until they match.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Is it worth the extra $20 to get a tuner? I have something to use for > reference for the E string, then tune the rest by 5th fret if it’s not. And > i read an article about how to set the intonation.

Response:

No, it’s E A D G. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert Pitch" also? – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – >E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

> OK.  Enough misinformation. > For a five string bass: > G approx 98Hz > D approx 73Hz > A approx 55Hz > E approx 41Hz > B approx 31Hz

    I like that "approx" stuff. That clears up everything. )

Response:

>The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220). >Anyway I think this is referred to as "Standard Pitch".  Maybe "Concert >Pitch" also?

OK.  Enough misinformation. For a five string bass: G approx 98Hz D approx 73Hz A approx 55Hz E approx 41Hz B approx 31Hz     Michael —

Response:

While that makes perfect logical sense, but on an FAQ, someone had done some measurments and found this:                        E       A       D       G       Natural   41.250  55.000  73.333  97.777 Even-   tempered 41.203  55.000  73.416  97.999   There is a whole lot more on this if any of you want it.  Just ask. Rufus – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->The "A" string of a bass is one octave lower than the fifth string of a >guitar (which I believe is 440Hz). >Therefore the bass "A" string would be 220Hz and the "E" would be something >lower than that.  (somewhere midway between 110 – 220).

Response:

What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? Pat.

Response:

>What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch?

Well, you can tune it that way if you like, but you might find what the rest of us use (EADG) more convenient. Michael —

Response:

E-1000 hz A- 440 hz I’m not sure about the rest.

Response:

EADG

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

The tuning of a bass is E (lowest) A, D, G (highest) I’m not sure what you mean by what pitch. E is the pitch. A is the pitch, etc. What octave maybe? It should be -3 under C. But tuning up a bass will tell you just by common sense. A E that’s tuned an octave too low will be so loose you won’t be able to play it. And an E an octave higher than it’s supposed to be tuned to would likely break/damage the neck. mike – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > What pitch is a bass to be tuned in?  I Think it is EDGA but what pitch? > Pat.

Response:

>E-1000 hz >A- 440 hz >I’m not sure about the rest.

You shouldn’t be sure about those, either, since they are completely wrong for bass. Michael —

Response:

How is it possible to tune my Audi A4 ? Could you send me some pictures ? Thanks

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->How is it possible to tune my Audi A4 ? Could you send me some pictures ? >Thanks >Go there: http://www.autotuning.net/

Response:

Related Posts

Write a comment