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sholder extension

Question:

One thing that has taken up a lot of my training time is shoulder extension… Looking at the Koreans, they seem to have quite a low extended shoulder…. whilst some of the Europeans and Americans [Rick McKinney comingto mind] seem to have quite a high but still extended shoulder.. The thing is with a high extension I find it hard to "lock" the shoulder in position, and the right scapula can push my left one out of line upon release… the low extension is easier to lock, but I find it is harder to get it right and keep it right, and I seem to fatigue quicker when shooting this way… Opinions [For those that done know me Im an olympic recurve shooter] Thanks Ewan — Ewan Oughton [0143324] 2nd Year B.Sc. Comp. Sys. http://www.10xshot.com — Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).

Response:

Hi Ewan – This shoulder alignment is both important, and difficult to monitor.   You really need a friend watching carefully or using a video camera so that you can check yourself.  At Loyd Brown’s direction I’ve been working with Lindsey on this a LOT and it’s making a big, big difference in her consistency. The Archery Anatomy book is a very good reference for this alignment that you mention.  My take on it is that you want to neutralize your shoulder’s position so that upon release, there is not a group of muscles that "sproing" from loss of stress.  In other words, if your shoulder position is set where the BONES take the majority of stress, and the leftover stress is evenly distibuted AROUND the joint, then on release no motion of left/right,up/down occurs, only a slight  extending movement of the entire arm (and therefore slightly the shoulder) towards the target. If your shoulder is not tucked in or set right, then it will make an obvious movement upon loosing of the arrow.   One of the more common mistakes archers make that affects the shoulder also, is "laying back" as they draw in an attempt to get to click and this tends to raise that bow shoulder out of center. I also gather that it’s very difficult to get the shoulder into proper place if your other shoulder and the spine are not in proper alignment.  Again, that book shows it well, as does Rick McKinney’s book. One could say there is a "sweet spot" that you will recognize when you find it, I think.  Have your friend watch and tell you where your bow shoulder goes when the loose happens, and work from there.  Of course, while you are working on this, don’t worry about where the arrow hits relative to the gold.  Focus on the shoulder for a bit.  Once you have learned how to consistently stabilize your shoulder, you can then look back to where the arrow hits the target TexARC – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > One thing that has taken up a lot of my training time is shoulder > extension… > Looking at the Koreans, they seem to have quite a low extended shoulder…. > whilst some of the Europeans and Americans [Rick McKinney comingto mind] > seem to have quite a high but still extended shoulder.. The thing is with a > high extension I find it hard to "lock" the shoulder in position, and the > right scapula can push my left one out of line upon release… the low > extension is easier to lock, but I find it is harder to get it right and > keep it right, and I seem to fatigue quicker when shooting this way… > Opinions > [For those that done know me Im an olympic recurve shooter] > Thanks > Ewan > — > Ewan Oughton [0143324] > 2nd Year B.Sc. Comp. Sys. > http://www.10xshot.com > — > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).

– TexARC publicize the sport of Archery! http://www.texasarchery.org Outgoing messages scanned for viruses by Nortons AV 2002

Response:

One of the things I’ve learned after 50 years of archery competition is that no two people shoot exactly the same. Your own body configuration is the principle factor, and while it is possible to force your shoulder position to mimic someone else’s, you will ultimately find it best to find your own natural position. You might look at page 82 of Archery Anatomy by Ray Rexford. The Koreans have adopted the low shoulder position because it offers many people a good bone lineup to aid in holding steady. The Korean coaches are utilitarian thinkers; if it works – do it! Good luck, Jerry

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> One thing that has taken up a lot of my training time is shoulder > extension… > Looking at the Koreans, they seem to have quite a low extended shoulder…. > whilst some of the Europeans and Americans [Rick McKinney comingto mind] > seem to have quite a high but still extended shoulder.. The thing is with a > high extension I find it hard to "lock" the shoulder in position, and the > right scapula can push my left one out of line upon release… the low > extension is easier to lock, but I find it is harder to get it right and > keep it right, and I seem to fatigue quicker when shooting this way… > Opinions > [For those that done know me Im an olympic recurve shooter] > Thanks > Ewan > — > Ewan Oughton [0143324] > 2nd Year B.Sc. Comp. Sys. > http://www.10xshot.com > — > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).

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