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RECURVE

Question:

I would like to start shooting a recurve bow in addition to my compound. What is/could be a good recurve to start with? —     |               Timothy L. Mattson                     |     |              System Administrator                    |     |   B&A Computer Operations  |  Ford Motor Company     |    /)    Voice: 313-323-7265        FAX: 313-322-4359      ( (( )  /,)                                             / )  / //)/ _/ /                                               _/ ////       /                                                      /      _/                                                  _   /                                                        /  /

Response:

>Path: news1.cris.com!news2.acs.oakland.edu!jobone!ef2007!fiesta.srl.ford.com!eccd b1.pms.ford.com!be0968.be.ford.com!mattson >Newsgroups: rec.sport.archery >Organization: Ford Motor Company >Lines: 20 >Distribution: world >NNTP-Posting-Host: be0968.be.ford.com >Keywords: RECURVE >I would like to start shooting a recurve bow in addition to my compound. >What is/could be a good recurve to start with? >–

Tim, If you would like to start shooting a recurve it’s important to keep a few things in mind. I will assume off the shelf and without sights. First is to have fun learning…. If you are used to pounding the XX shooting your compound with a  sight system  this could get a little frustrating for you.  So approach with a good open attitude.   Second – Buy a good bow. One that you would be excited to own. Does not have to be the top of the line but I always recommend a custom rather than something someone has pulled out from under the bed. (This investment will also provide incentive and investment in your effort). The local archery shop will usually have a few used bows. Make sure you do not overbow yourself with a heavy draw weight. A 55lb bow is excellent place to start. You need to develop your form for shooting instinctively. This is critical for continued accuracy improvement. You can’t develop good form when the bow is to heavy for you. Don’t let anyone sell you a bow that is too heavy. (I used to shoot 65+lbs with my compound – 60lbs with my first traditional bows and after 8 years I now have settled in a 52lbs at my draw length of 25 inches. Third – Buy good arrows. Probably the most overlooked and equally critical factor for your shooting accuracy and pleasure. I like wood arrows, they are beautiful and matched to my bow weight and draw length. If your arrows are not matched they will not shoot where you are looking (the key to instinctive shooting) because they will be over/under spined. A good arrowsmith is a must. (I can suggest more if you would like to email me) Read & Watch – Books on instinctive shooting are available. G Fred Asbell and John Shultz both do an excellent job explaining the instinctive method. The John Shultz video is my favorite (very dry and not very entertaining) but hits the fundamentals head on. Shoot, Shoot and shoot some more –  there is not a subsitute for practice. But do not look at it as a chore. You’ll find it something you will want to do. It is fun to shoot instinctive, it is addictive and you will find yourself pulling your arrows saying to yourself, one more round, one more round. There is something captivating about looking at a spot 20 yards away and popping it instinctively. (There is also the fact of missing it by three feet that keeps you going back) Have fun – I have bowhunted for 20 years the last 8 with recurve/longbow. No one in my hunting group or even anyone I knew at that time was shooting traditional. After I started and they got of taste of the experience they are now all long time traditional shooters. That is bcause it is fun. And believe me — you can develop into a very accurate shot.  I have taken pats, rabbits, deer, squirrels and a few assorted chipmunks with my longbows. (Now all sitting on their butts either)  Good Luck  Bob

Response:

Robert Hall writes > Make sure you do not overbow yourself with >a heavy draw weight. A 55lb bow is excellent place to start. You need to >develop your form for shooting instinctively. This is critical for continued >accuracy improvement. You can’t develop good form when the bow is to >heavy for you. Don’t let anyone sell you a bow that is too heavy.

The above is taken out of context but the meaning is presumed to be correct..  For the most part I would not recommend anyone starting on a recurve that heavy after shooting a compound only.  Keep in mind that you are holding the entire weight of the bow at full draw.  A better solution,  and a better place to start, would be to buy a recurve bow which is a draw weight compatible with what your holding weight is on the compound bow.  If you are shooting 60 lbs on the compound and is a 50% letoff (mostly nowdays ancient history), buy a 30 lb bow and start there.  If the gentlemen meant traditional bows, most of which do not go that light in draw weight, then stick around the 40-45 lbs until you get your rotator cuff muscles in shape (or you will be sorry). Just an opinion from a barebow shooter

Response:

L. Mattson) writes: >I would like to start shooting a recurve bow in addition to my compound. >What is/could be a good recurve to start with?

Tim, I’d start with a used Ben Pearson or Bear. Probably $75-100. Compound shooters usually are shocked to find how much harder it is to pull a recurve than it was to pull their compounds. So I’d start with a recurve that is lighter than what you want to end up with. That means, IMHO, that if you want to hunt, and if you want to shoot 55-60# or more recurve, you had better start with something like 45#. You’ll quickly want to dump it, since you’ll shoot such a rainbow, but that’s better than overbowing yourself right away. It’s part of the price of getting started. Maybe you can make a deal with a pro-shop regarding trading the lighter bow in within a six months. Of course, all that caution has to do with the average-strong male. If you’re somebody who works out, who has a strong back, as well as shoulder muscles, go for the gold. But don’t say somebody didn’t warn you! Read Traditional Bowhunter to see ads for bowyers and mail order houses. I’m talking about preparation for purchase of your SECOND, probably heavier recurve. If you want to buy cheap/good/new, I’d recommend Damon Howatt bows at around $200. If you want to buy a keeper at a fair price, you might want to look at Bob Lee’s takedown recurves, or at Dan Quillian’s Canebreak (one pc) or Patriot (takedown). $400-500. Hard to beat any of those. Buy from American bowyers unless you speak the appropriate foreign language (I’m thinking about PSE here). Why? Because you will enjoy talking to your bowyer, it’s one of the pleasures of owning a handcrafted or partially handcrafted bow. John Compound shooters that are comfortable 70# bows are typically shocked by 55# recurves. You have to remember that those pulleys and cams are there to help you pull heavier bows than you might be up to otherwise. With a good 60#-70# recurve you may get as much as 215fps (or you may not) with 500gr arrows. It’s a different game.

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