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Range etiquette

Question:

Last Saturday, I went to an archery/firearms range for the first time (I’ve been shooting my bow in my apartment up until now). There was a man at the range that I was shooting next to and he was taking a very long time to between shots.  Most of the time, I waited as not to distract him.  At the times when I didn’t, I was easily shooting twice as many arrows as he was.  This was without rushing my shots. My faster shooting was probably something of a distraction to him, but obviously less than the pistols and rifles going off less than a quarter mile away. Should I wait for someone like this?  Again, he was taking a very long time preparing his shot.  In regards to our shooting, I would say we were about the same (not terrible, but not ready for the Olympics). Phil visit the New York City Homebrewers Guild website! http://www.pipeline.com/~dogglebe/nychg.html

Response:

No need to wait. — Michael Suffolk Archers and Bow Hunters Long Island, N.Y.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Last Saturday, I went to an archery/firearms range for the first time > (I’ve been shooting my bow in my apartment up until now). > There was a man at the range that I was shooting next to and he was > taking a very long time to between shots.  Most of the time, I waited > as not to distract him.  At the times when I didn’t, I was easily > shooting twice as many arrows as he was.  This was without rushing my > shots. > My faster shooting was probably something of a distraction to him, but > obviously less than the pistols and rifles going off less than a > quarter mile away. > Should I wait for someone like this?  Again, he was taking a very long > time preparing his shot.  In regards to our shooting, I would say we > were about the same (not terrible, but not ready for the Olympics). > Phil > visit the New York City Homebrewers Guild website! > http://www.pipeline.com/~dogglebe/nychg.html

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->Last Saturday, I went to an archery/firearms range for the first time >(I’ve been shooting my bow in my apartment up until now). >There was a man at the range that I was shooting next to and he was >taking a very long time to between shots.  Most of the time, I waited >as not to distract him.  At the times when I didn’t, I was easily >shooting twice as many arrows as he was.  This was without rushing my >shots. >My faster shooting was probably something of a distraction to him, but >obviously less than the pistols and rifles going off less than a >quarter mile away. >Should I wait for someone like this?  Again, he was taking a very long >time preparing his shot.  In regards to our shooting, I would say we >were about the same (not terrible, but not ready for the Olympics).

No need to wait.  The only thing to keep in mind is that some people don’t like it when you come off the line when they are at full draw.  So you may want to wait till they are between shots to come off the line.  Also be be careful not to bump someone on the line with any of your equipment. That will upset most shooters.   Alex     __O        _-<,_       (_)/ (_)

Response:

I agree. Shoot at your own pace, but don’t stand down until the other archer has finished a follow thru — John Dickmon http://www.benefit4kids.org http://www.sportsmenagainsthunger.org http://www.pathwai.org

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->Last Saturday, I went to an archery/firearms range for the first time >(I’ve been shooting my bow in my apartment up until now). >There was a man at the range that I was shooting next to and he was >taking a very long time to between shots.  Most of the time, I waited >as not to distract him.  At the times when I didn’t, I was easily >shooting twice as many arrows as he was.  This was without rushing my >shots. >My faster shooting was probably something of a distraction to him, but >obviously less than the pistols and rifles going off less than a >quarter mile away. >Should I wait for someone like this?  Again, he was taking a very long >time preparing his shot.  In regards to our shooting, I would say we >were about the same (not terrible, but not ready for the Olympics). > No need to wait.  The only thing to keep in mind is that some people don’t > like it when you come off the line when they are at full draw.  So you may > want to wait till they are between shots to come off the line.  Also be > be careful not to bump someone on the line with any of your equipment. > That will upset most shooters. > Alex     __O >        _-<,_ >       (_)/ (_)

Response:

"Bowhunter1" wrote > No need to wait.

Agreed. He shoots his match, you shoot yours. Just don’t drop arrows and try to hook them back with your bow, or turn away from the line when he’s at full draw, or belt him with your longrod — ever, or hold your bow canted at such an angle that you obscure his vision with the upper limb or strike him with the lower one. He may not have been tetchy with you. Most probably with himself (I’m going to call our club bar the "Happy Archer"). If he Was teed off with you, he needs to master some concentration skills, maybe. Keep it light and polite. As one of our senior lady archers said, seeing my scowling face, "Smile! You’re supposed to be doing it for fun!" Ian

Response:

It could also be he was getting wound up by having someone try to match his pace! I’ve seen a few archers get paranoid about "holding other people up". In the final analysis, if you’re not physically interfering with another person, they ought to be able to deal with whatever you do – it’s their problem not yours. Having said that, politeness suggests that we all ought to make our best effort to be unobtrusive, but shooting can’t be considered obtrusive (that would sort of defeat the object, wouldn’t it?). – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > "Bowhunter1" wrote > No need to wait. > Agreed. He shoots his match, you shoot yours. Just don’t drop arrows and try > to hook them back with your bow, or turn away from the line when he’s at > full draw, or belt him with your longrod — ever, or hold your bow canted at > such an angle that you obscure his vision with the upper limb or strike him > with the lower one. He may not have been tetchy with you. Most probably with > himself (I’m going to call our club bar the "Happy Archer"). If he Was teed > off with you, he needs to master some concentration skills, maybe. Keep it > light and polite. As one of our senior lady archers said, seeing my scowling > face, "Smile! You’re supposed to be doing it for fun!" > Ian

Response:

> It could also be he was getting wound up by having someone try to > match his pace!

He wasn’t waiting for me; it was the other way around.  When I stopped waiting for him, I was shooting close to twice as fast (twice as often?) as he was. When I look back, I realize it was wrong to think I was distracting him.  After all, there were firearms going off nearby. Phil visit the New York City Homebrewers Guild website: http://www.pipeline.com/~dogglebe/nychg.html

Response:

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