Sport Archery » Archery Arrows » Keeping my arrows in one piece

Keeping my arrows in one piece

Question:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> I ordered a dozen ACCs from a well-known UK archery vendor a couple of > weeks back. Took them out on Wednesday night for a National at the > local club, and came back with one single usable arrow at the end of > the evening. > Lost the nock from one by the simple expedient of shooting it out with > my next arrow, but ten of them no longer have points. Some of them are > still embedded in the boss, and a few failed sufficiently badly under > deceleration to land five metres or so behind the target. > The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so > I’ve bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in > myself. > So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt > or should I epoxy them in ? > jd

I would go for using hotmelt, and have a stick of hotmelt & a lighter in your tackle box / bag. I really do recommend learning to build your own shafts.  Even if you just have to get the supplied to cut them to length, do fletch them & put the points in.  It seems to me that certain suppliers use saliva instead of glue for the fletchings…    You certainly shouldn’t have all the fletchings falling off a new set of arrows withing a month! I made my own arrows up (ACCs, got them cut to size by the suppliers).   Fletched them myself, put the points in myself!  Haven’t lost any points or fletchings in 4 years! — brian

Response:

I use hotmelt from a standard glue-gun. The trick is to not be sparing with it. Put a good bead around the end of the insert (and a little bit over the end) and down the length of it. Then twist the point into place. If it sticks part way, then apply a little heat to the point to re-melt the glue (either a gas flame or a cup of hot water from the kettle). If you’ve used enough glue, there should be a largish collar of the stuff sticking out at the junction between the shaft and the point, which can be peeled off after the glue has set. I’ve also used epoxy, and it works (subject to the same condition – you have to use enough), but you’ll never get the point out again. Which means, as soon as you flatten a point on a staple or stand, you’re down an arrow… – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > I ordered a dozen ACCs from a well-known UK archery vendor a couple of weeks > back. Took them out on Wednesday night for a National at the local club, and > came back with one single usable arrow at the end of the evening. > Lost the nock from one by the simple expedient of shooting it out with my > next arrow, but ten of them no longer have points. Some of them are still > embedded in the boss, and a few failed sufficiently badly under deceleration > to land five metres or so behind the target. > The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. > So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt or > should I epoxy them in ? > jd > John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk > argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK > (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 > PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

Response:

> The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself.

Replying to myself (for which I apologise …) I was wrong. I spoke too soon. A package arrived in the mail this morning from the well-known UK archery supplier and, though they’d asked for a credit card number when I ordered replacement points, they didn’t use it. jd John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

Response:

John One thing I have discovered with ACC’s is there is often a greasy black coating inside the shaft and unless that’s cleaned out glues will not stick. I bought a rifle bore brush of the appropriate diameter.   Now as a matter of course when gluing points in ACC’s I chuck it in a drill, dip it in acetone and scrub out the end of each shaft. Bill – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. > Replying to myself (for which I apologise …) > I was wrong. I spoke too soon. > A package arrived in the mail this morning from the well-known UK archery > supplier and, though they’d asked for a credit card number when I ordered > replacement points, they didn’t use it. > jd > John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk > argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK > (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 > PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

Response:

I found the same thing with my daughters ACCs.  I used a Q-tip dipped in 91% alcohol to clean the inside of the tube.  Comes out black and yucky Also helps to keep knocks in so that when she shoots we don’t see these little streaks of green go flying by norm – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> John > One thing I have discovered with ACC’s is there is often a greasy black > coating inside the shaft and unless that’s cleaned out glues will not stick. > I bought a rifle bore brush of the appropriate diameter.   Now as a matter of > course when gluing points in ACC’s I chuck it in a drill, dip it in acetone > and scrub out the end of each shaft. > Bill > > The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve > > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. > Replying to myself (for which I apologise …) > I was wrong. I spoke too soon. > A package arrived in the mail this morning from the well-known UK archery > supplier and, though they’d asked for a credit card number when I ordered > replacement points, they didn’t use it. > jd > John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk > argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK > (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 > PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

Response:

not so much greasy as merely dusty, from (I think) cutting the shafts.  I noticed this when I cleaned them as you described, and then cut another small piece off – the insides were again coated with a very fine powder.   I also use a vacuum while cutting to vent the dust outside when cutting<G>…. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > I found the same thing with my daughters ACCs.  I used a Q-tip dipped in 91% > alcohol to clean the inside of the tube.  Comes out black and yucky > Also helps to keep knocks in so that when she shoots we don’t see these > little streaks of green go flying by > norm > John > One thing I have discovered with ACC’s is there is often a greasy black > coating inside the shaft and unless that’s cleaned out glues will not > stick. > I bought a rifle bore brush of the appropriate diameter.   Now as a matter > of > course when gluing points in ACC’s I chuck it in a drill, dip it in > acetone > and scrub out the end of each shaft. > Bill > > > The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so > I’ve > > > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. > > Replying to myself (for which I apologise …) > > I was wrong. I spoke too soon. > > A package arrived in the mail this morning from the well-known UK > archery > > supplier and, though they’d asked for a credit card number when I > ordered > > replacement points, they didn’t use it. > > jd > > John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk > > argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK > > (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 > > PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

– TexARC publicize the sport of Archery! http://www.texasarchery.org Outgoing messages scanned for viruses by Nortons AV 2002

Response:

>The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve >bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself.

Suggestion 1: Quantity is more important than  than quality to some/many/most (delete as appropriate) archery vendors. Suggestion 2: If you want to ensure your kit is 110%, learn to do everything yourself, including gluing fletches/points, fitting nocks and making strings. Anything else is false economy. >So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt or >should I epoxy them in ?

Hot-melt is good, especially if you might consider changing point weights in the future. It also allows you to recover and re-use the points should you destroy the arrow through some other means. If you have screw-in nibs, a little hotmelt on those too will help prevent them unscrewing. Suggestion 3: If you have the chance, get a loan of an accurate grain scale and weigh all your arrows and points, then match them to as close a tolerance as you can. Some arrows from the manufacturer will show a significant difference in weight accross the range since they don’t bother to do any tolerance matching.

Response:

> So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt or > should I epoxy them in ? > jd

As someone who used to frequently leave points and inserts in target legs, I was messing around, and what works best for me is to use both. (Well, hotmelt and whatever glue I can lay my hands on.) Hotmelt on the point, then superglue/epoxy round the end of the shaft. Push together, and leave to set. Just my 0.02. Tom — Tell me why I had to be a powerslave I don’t wanna die, I’m a god, why can’t I live on?

Response:

>As someone who used to frequently leave points and inserts in target >legs

Why on earth would anyone want to shoot target legs? The target itself is MUCH bigger and easier to hit. ;o) Only joking mate… I put an arrow in the wood at the top of a foam butt a couple of weeks ago at a compeition and ended up pulling the point out (and went on to win the competition, but that’s beside the "point" – arf arf)

Response:

> >As someone who used to frequently leave points and inserts in target >legs > Why on earth would anyone want to shoot target legs? The target itself > is MUCH bigger and easier to hit. ;o) > Only joking mate… I put an arrow in the wood at the top of a foam > butt a couple of weeks ago at a compeition and ended up pulling the > point out (and went on to win the competition, but that’s beside the > "point" – arf arf)

Nice! When shooting target legs, the thing to remember is that the legs on most standard tripod stands for straw bosses go quite nicely along the red/blue border. And at the right distance, that’s about the size of my group. (Just FYI – I shot some of these things into a new boss from 20 yards to see how hard the boss was once. The arrows came about eight inches out the back, and it took two of us to pull them out. It’s _fast_. On a boss that is medium soft (i.e. normal) I get about a foot of arrow out the back.) Tom — Tell me why I had to be a powerslave I don’t wanna die, I’m a god, why can’t I live on?

Response:

I’m sure that hot-melt glue will work just fine, but there is a technique. You have to gently  heat the entire insert portion just enough to be able to paint the entire surface of the point (just the part that goes inside the shaft) with a coating of the glue.  Not a heavy layer, just enough to be visible.  If the glue bubbles or smokes when you apply it to the point insert, you’ve used too much heat.  Wait a few seconds and try again. While the glue-applied point cools slightly, hold the glue stick in the flame briefly to liquify it and drag this goo over the END of the shaft, so that some of it is positioned over the opening.  As you insert the point, you PUSH that little glop of glue INTO the shaft ahead of the point insert.  I suspect this is one of the "clues". Push the point in, and turn it as it goes a LITTLE, rotating perhaps 1/2 of a revolution.  (another clue). Immediately invert and press gently the shaft and point down onto the counter (I use a magazine so I don’t damage the dining room table<G>, thereby avoiding the wrath of SWMBO (she who must be obeyed). After a 10 count I lay the shaft down to allow the glue to harden fully before I peel the collar of glue that the shaft pushed off of the point insert. These will NOT pull apart even if you shoot into Whitetail Buttresses. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > I ordered a dozen ACCs from a well-known UK archery vendor a couple of weeks > back. Took them out on Wednesday night for a National at the local club, and > came back with one single usable arrow at the end of the evening. > Lost the nock from one by the simple expedient of shooting it out with my > next arrow, but ten of them no longer have points. Some of them are still > embedded in the boss, and a few failed sufficiently badly under deceleration > to land five metres or so behind the target. > The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve > bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. > So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt or > should I epoxy them in ? > jd > John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk > argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK > (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 > PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

– TexARC publicize the sport of Archery! http://www.texasarchery.org Outgoing messages scanned for viruses by Nortons AV 2002

Response:

I ordered a dozen ACCs from a well-known UK archery vendor a couple of weeks back. Took them out on Wednesday night for a National at the local club, and came back with one single usable arrow at the end of the evening. Lost the nock from one by the simple expedient of shooting it out with my next arrow, but ten of them no longer have points. Some of them are still embedded in the boss, and a few failed sufficiently badly under deceleration to land five metres or so behind the target. The vendor was sorry, but not sorry enough to replace the points, so I’ve bought some more and I’m going to glue the little buggers in myself. So, here’s the question : do I just go foe more workmanlike hot-melt or should I epoxy them in ? jd John Daragon  johnAT<remove_this>argvDOTcoDOTuk argv[0] limited, The Willows, Compton Chamberlayne, SP3 5DF, UK (v) +44 1722 714475    (f) +44 1722 714576   (m) +44 7836 576 127 PGP Public key available on request or from ldap://certserver.pgp.com

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