Sport Archery » Hunting Archery » Dual Cam v. Single Cam… I need much more input please…

Dual Cam v. Single Cam… I need much more input please…

Question:

I am in the market for a new bow, in particular, the Hoyt Protec… I have heard VERY compelling arguments on both sides concerning things like Timing, complexity, field replacement, nock oscillation, effeciency, smoothness, etc etc… THe one argument that was pushing me over the top was when someone put forth that ALL the world class compound archers used single cam bows… Then another Bloke chimes in that they HAVE to use these bows because the companies are marketing them and the sponsored shooters have to shoot what they are given… He went on to say that the manufacturers love the single cams because they can be produced at less cost but can still be sold at the same or high price of their dual cam counterparts… (hiding behind the monicker of "innovation") I am an archery hobbyist and I love archery but not with the all consuming passion that I would wish, and so in turn I need all the help I can get!  I would like to get a bow that will provide me with the greatest probably of success as opposed to the latest techological innovation… THey say higher arrow speeds are tyupical with dual cam bows because they are more effecient… *sigh*  Too much info!  Advice please David

Response:

Dual vs Single. Hoo, boy. Talk about a can of worms. > I am in the market for a new bow, in particular, the Hoyt Protec… > I have heard VERY compelling arguments on both sides concerning things > like Timing, complexity, field replacement, nock oscillation, > effeciency, smoothness, etc etc…

All true, but apparently some companies have solved the nock oscillation on single cams problem – Darton for certain, and allegedly (totally unsubstantiated rumour) Hoyt are working on a cam that sorts out the problem. > The one argument that was pushing me over the top was when someone put > forth that ALL the world class compound archers used single cam > bows… Then another Bloke chimes in that they HAVE to use these bows > because the companies are marketing them and the sponsored shooters > have to shoot what they are given…

Someone (can’t remember who) won, I think, an ASA shoot recently with a dual cam (Realtree Outdoors Tennessee Pro/Am, for anyone that interested) and interestingly, a Hoyt ProTec. All world class archers being told what to shoot – I’ve heard this one before, and it’s still wrong. Sponsored shooters get a bow THEY want, not what they are given. The idea is, if they get a bow they like, so long as it’s the right (i.e. their sponsor’s) company, who cares which model? > He went on to say that the manufacturers love the single cams because > they can be produced at less cost but can still be sold at the same or > high price of their dual cam counterparts… (hiding behind the > monicker of "innovation")

Ooooh. Novel idea. Anyone care to guess how much a single costs in comparison to a pair, given that it requires more machining but (probably) less material? > I am an archery hobbyist and I love archery but not with the all > consuming passion that I would wish, and so in turn I need all the > help I can get!  I would like to get a bow that will provide me with > the greatest probably of success as opposed to the latest techological > innovation… THey say higher arrow speeds are tyupical with dual cam > bows because they are more effecient…

If you are a speed freak (OK, like me ) go for a twin cam. Fastest I have heard of a single cam actually shoot under semi-realistic conditions was the BowTech Patriot, which kicks out about 320 fps. The Black Knight 2, also BowTech, is a dual cam and does around 340. You’ve already mentioned timing problems, and they can be much magnified on a dual cam. Mine is slightly out of time, but not enough that I consider it a problem. Single cam archers will keep on about how they never have to adjust their timing, etc. The fact is that timing, if done properly in the first place (see your local pro shop – if you are really lucky, they’ll do it for FREE!) should only change slightly over a year. And cables get replaced every year, so there you go. > *sigh*  Too much info!  Advice please > David

OK, here’s my 0.02 (as if I haven’t chipped in enough already ) go with the dual cam. DO NOT (Hey, it’s my 0.02, I’ll shout if I want to) get the Accuwheel cams – they are slow, slow, slow! And even if slower does mean more accurate, you do not want to go that slowly – an IBO speed of 255-265 fps means a real-world speed of about 220 at best. Command+ Cams have been shot successfully by someone I know and he is far happier with them than he was with a) the Accuwheels he had before (Hoyt Carbonite, or possibly Striker) or b) the single cam that he could have had. Also, you don’t say if this is for fingers or release, hunting, target, or a mixture. The only real difference is a longer axle to axle is better for finger shooters. Anyway, enjoy. Tom — These Five Words In My Head Scream "Are We Having Fun Yet?" And the answer is …. definitely!

Response:

Buy a Matthews Icon…most accurate bow made today. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > Dual vs Single. Hoo, boy. Talk about a can of worms. > I am in the market for a new bow, in particular, the Hoyt Protec… > I have heard VERY compelling arguments on both sides concerning things > like Timing, complexity, field replacement, nock oscillation, > effeciency, smoothness, etc etc… > All true, but apparently some companies have solved the nock oscillation > on single cams problem – Darton for certain, and allegedly (totally > unsubstantiated rumour) Hoyt are working on a cam that sorts out the > problem. > The one argument that was pushing me over the top was when someone put > forth that ALL the world class compound archers used single cam > bows… Then another Bloke chimes in that they HAVE to use these bows > because the companies are marketing them and the sponsored shooters > have to shoot what they are given… > Someone (can’t remember who) won, I think, an ASA shoot recently with a > dual cam (Realtree Outdoors Tennessee Pro/Am, for anyone that > interested) and interestingly, a Hoyt ProTec. > All world class archers being told what to shoot – I’ve heard this one > before, and it’s still wrong. Sponsored shooters get a bow THEY want, > not what they are given. The idea is, if they get a bow they like, so > long as it’s the right (i.e. their sponsor’s) company, who cares which > model? > He went on to say that the manufacturers love the single cams because > they can be produced at less cost but can still be sold at the same or > high price of their dual cam counterparts… (hiding behind the > monicker of "innovation") > Ooooh. Novel idea. Anyone care to guess how much a single costs in > comparison to a pair, given that it requires more machining but > (probably) less material? > I am an archery hobbyist and I love archery but not with the all > consuming passion that I would wish, and so in turn I need all the > help I can get!  I would like to get a bow that will provide me with > the greatest probably of success as opposed to the latest techological > innovation… THey say higher arrow speeds are tyupical with dual cam > bows because they are more effecient… > If you are a speed freak (OK, like me ) go for a twin cam. Fastest I > have heard of a single cam actually shoot under semi-realistic > conditions was the BowTech Patriot, which kicks out about 320 fps. The > Black Knight 2, also BowTech, is a dual cam and does around 340. You’ve > already mentioned timing problems, and they can be much magnified on a > dual cam. Mine is slightly out of time, but not enough that I consider > it a problem. Single cam archers will keep on about how they never have > to adjust their timing, etc. The fact is that timing, if done properly > in the first place (see your local pro shop – if you are really lucky, > they’ll do it for FREE!) should only change slightly over a year. And > cables get replaced every year, so there you go. > *sigh*  Too much info!  Advice please > David > OK, here’s my 0.02 (as if I haven’t chipped in enough already ) go > with the dual cam. DO NOT (Hey, it’s my 0.02, I’ll shout if I want to) > get the Accuwheel cams – they are slow, slow, slow! And even if slower > does mean more accurate, you do not want to go that slowly – an IBO > speed of 255-265 fps means a real-world speed of about 220 at best. > Command+ Cams have been shot successfully by someone I know and he is > far happier with them than he was with a) the Accuwheels he had before > (Hoyt Carbonite, or possibly Striker) or b) the single cam that he could > have had. > Also, you don’t say if this is for fingers or release, hunting, target, > or a mixture. The only real difference is a longer axle to axle is > better for finger shooters. > Anyway, enjoy. > Tom > — > These Five Words In My Head > Scream "Are We Having Fun Yet?" > And the answer is …. definitely!

Response:

The bit about all of the world class archers shooting single cams takes a too narrow view of what it means to be a world class compound archery. I believe that the current FITA world target champion shoots a dual cam. In the USA, Dave Cousins (world record holder indoors) shoots a twin cam, and the current FITA record holder, outdoors 1414, is Roger Hoyle who also shoots a two cam bow. Let’s face it, both single and dual cam bows work well and have shot great scores. It is a matter of personal preference. Go with the bow and the configuration that you like and don’t worry, you won’t have made a mistake. — Arlington, Massachusetts USA

Response:

If you’ve never shot compound before, start with a round dual cam. I personally love dual cam bows, but that could have something to do with the solo I shot for 3 months that wrote off 4 X10’s:P I don’t really think there’s much difference. Most of the top british archers shoot duals (I may be a little out of date here, I missed all the stars last year and those so far this year:P) and those that didn’t shot matthews, who only make solo’s. I guess the best advice I could give is go to a shot, and spend a day shooting bows of both types. If a bow gives you a heart attack when it goes off try a new one. Have there been any big advances in the past few months. I currently shoot a Hoyt sapphire, and I’ll admit to being a little shy of solo-cams, but I might give them another try if they’ve improved drastically. Eleanor Johnson Captain Durham University Archery Club GNAS Leader – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > I am in the market for a new bow, in particular, the Hoyt Protec… > I have heard VERY compelling arguments on both sides concerning things > like Timing, complexity, field replacement, nock oscillation, > effeciency, smoothness, etc etc… > THe one argument that was pushing me over the top was when someone put > forth that ALL the world class compound archers used single cam > bows… Then another Bloke chimes in that they HAVE to use these bows > because the companies are marketing them and the sponsored shooters > have to shoot what they are given… > He went on to say that the manufacturers love the single cams because > they can be produced at less cost but can still be sold at the same or > high price of their dual cam counterparts… (hiding behind the > monicker of "innovation") > I am an archery hobbyist and I love archery but not with the all > consuming passion that I would wish, and so in turn I need all the > help I can get!  I would like to get a bow that will provide me with > the greatest probably of success as opposed to the latest techological > innovation… THey say higher arrow speeds are tyupical with dual cam > bows because they are more effecient… > *sigh*  Too much info!  Advice please > David

Response:

> but I might give them another try if they’ve improved >drastically.

What to improve? I would bet, when Merlin would put a single cam on their Max 2000, most british archery would shoot single cams. No kidding, if you get the chance to shoot the new ICON from Mathews, with a  ROUND single cam, you will be VERY surprised! I could imagine, you will sell your Hoyt after that experience. — Sven

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