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Can This Bow Be Adjusted?

Question:

Hi, I have an opportunity to obtain from a fellow club-member a Hoyt Medalist, 45# compound bow that’s in relatively good condition, at an unnamed, but guaranteed low, price.  Problem is: draw length.  It’s about an inch short for me.  Local archery shop says it can’t be adjusted.  Thought I’d ask here to make doubly-sure before giving it back. As to draw length, I’ve another question.  The way a colleague of mine at work said to measure it is to place one end of a yard-stick in the hollow of your throat and hold it straight out, between the palms of you hands, and measure the distance to the ends of your finger-tips.  Going by that, my draw length is 31".  (I’m 6′4" tall and have long arms.)  But the guy at the archery shop to which I took the bow said it’s perfect for him and he’s got a 28" draw.  But it’s only 1" short for me.  What’s the scoop?  Was my work colleague’s advice wrong? Thanks, Jim — Jim Seymour                    | PGP Public Key available at: is a spam trap.  DON’T USE IT! |

Response:

> As to draw length, I’ve another question.  The way a colleague of > mine at work said to measure it is to place one end of a yard-stick > in the hollow of your throat and hold it straight out, between the > palms of you hands, and measure the distance to the ends of your > finger-tips.  Going by that, my draw length is 31".  (I’m 6′4" tall > and have long arms.)  But the guy at the archery shop to which I took > the bow said it’s perfect for him and he’s got a 28" draw.  But it’s > only 1" short for me.  What’s the scoop?  Was my work colleague’s > advice wrong?

The "chest to fingertips" method is a good rough-and-ready guide if you are distributing club arrows to a beginners course or dispensing arrows to customers at a have-a-go session, but the only accurate method of deciding draw (and hence arrow) length is to draw up a graduated arrow on the bow that you actually intend to shoot. For a complete beginner it is a good idea to start with overlong arrows since draw length almost always increases as strength and technique improve with practice. Best wishes Chris

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hi, > I have an opportunity to obtain from a fellow club-member a Hoyt > Medalist, 45# compound bow that’s in relatively good condition, at an > unnamed, but guaranteed low, price.  Problem is: draw length.  It’s > about an inch short for me.  Local archery shop says it can’t be > adjusted.  Thought I’d ask here to make doubly-sure before giving it > back. > As to draw length, I’ve another question.  The way a colleague of > mine at work said to measure it is to place one end of a yard-stick > in the hollow of your throat and hold it straight out, between the > palms of you hands, and measure the distance to the ends of your > finger-tips.  Going by that, my draw length is 31".  (I’m 6′4" tall > and have long arms.)  But the guy at the archery shop to which I took > the bow said it’s perfect for him and he’s got a 28" draw.  But it’s > only 1" short for me.  What’s the scoop?  Was my work colleague’s > advice wrong?

My method – feel free to laugh and/or take the Disney. Start by standing normally. Your arm will probably be naturally bent a bit. Without bending or straightening it, bring it up to shooting level – level with your shoulders. The distance from reference point (probably level in a vertical plane with the corner of your mouth) to the web of skin between thumb and forefinger is your draw length. (Mine kicks out about 29" like this, and that sounds right.) Cheers 7om > Thanks, > Jim > — > Jim Seymour                    | PGP Public Key available at:

http://www.uk.pgp.net/pgpnet/pks-commands.html – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> is a spam trap.  DON’T USE IT! |

Response:

As to the real question that you asked . This bow can be adjusted if you can find some more cams for it. And I hate to tell you that you could stand a better chance of finding snowballs in hell quicker. This is an older bow and parts are going to be hard to come by. If it is that much too short for you I would take it back and look further for a bow that really fits you. Jane

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hi, > I have an opportunity to obtain from a fellow club-member a Hoyt > Medalist, 45# compound bow that’s in relatively good condition, at an > unnamed, but guaranteed low, price.  Problem is: draw length.  It’s > about an inch short for me.  Local archery shop says it can’t be > adjusted.  Thought I’d ask here to make doubly-sure before giving it > back. > As to draw length, I’ve another question.  The way a colleague of > mine at work said to measure it is to place one end of a yard-stick > in the hollow of your throat and hold it straight out, between the > palms of you hands, and measure the distance to the ends of your > finger-tips.  Going by that, my draw length is 31".  (I’m 6′4" tall > and have long arms.)  But the guy at the archery shop to which I took > the bow said it’s perfect for him and he’s got a 28" draw.  But it’s > only 1" short for me.  What’s the scoop?  Was my work colleague’s > advice wrong? > Thanks, > Jim > — > Jim Seymour                    | PGP Public Key available at:

http://www.uk.pgp.net/pgpnet/pks-commands.html – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> is a spam trap.  DON’T USE IT! |

Response:

> As to the real question that you asked . This bow can be adjusted if you can > find some more cams for it. And I hate to tell you that you could stand a > better chance of finding snowballs in hell quicker.

The colleague at work that suggested the draw-length measurement technique told me pretty much the same thing.  Plus he said they’d be expen$ive. >                                                     This is an older bow > and parts are going to be hard to come by. If it is that much too short for > you I would take it back and look further for a bow that really fits you.

He said that, too.  Guess I have my answer.  Too bad.  Haven’t used it yet.  It’s just been sitting in the corner so far.  But even then: I’ve become kind of attached to it.  Ah well…  guess it’ll be a while more before I’ll be trying my hand at archery. Thanks for the follow-up, Jane.  And thanks also to Chris and Tom for their comments. Regards, Jim — Jim Seymour                    | PGP Public Key available at: is a spam trap.  DON’T USE IT! |

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