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Question:

Just look at a Mathews SQ2 anyone have any comments I am little worried about problems. The only dealer is miles away from me. Has anyone ever bought from them direct.

Response:

Bucky, As stated in previous posts regarding Mathews; they will not sell directly to the customer.  They work primarily through their dealers. As for the SQ2… in my opinion, it’s a very nice bow.  Smooth, easy draw with a solid wall, but like other Mathews don’t let it creep – they like to GO when you’re wishy-washy on your anchor. I’m curious; what exactly are you worried about?  The overall quality is quite good (aah, let the beatings begin).  I’ve owned several Mathews and have yet to experience a problem aside from normal wear-and-tear.  If your Pro-shop is so far away I would consider learning how to service your own bow.  There’s enough information out there to easily walk you through most of what you need to know, and some of the stuff you may not want to know. Enjoy! — Brad Remove broadhead when shooting me an email

Just look at a Mathews SQ2 anyone have any comments I am little worried about problems. The only dealer is miles away from me. Has anyone ever bought from them direct.

Response:

>Just look at a Mathews SQ2 anyone have any comments >I am little worried about problems. The only dealer is miles away from me. >Has anyone ever bought from them direct.

They will not sell direct. In fact they will ONLY honor the warrantee if the work is done by one of THEIR dealers. They will not ship parts to ANY customer. They will not ship parts to any ol’ pro-shop, only ‘approved dealers’. In fact you can not even BUY parts from them. They will not even sell you a string. You MUST buy everything only at an ‘approved dealer’. Pure b.s.

Response:

As previously post, then what could would it do for me to learn to work on my own bow if they would not sell any parts needed..duh, I have a friend who broke a limb on the second day of bow season. It TOOK 3-4 WEEKS… thats a long time to me when you spend 600-800 dollars for a bow..thats what I am worried about..

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->Just look at a Mathews SQ2 anyone have any comments >I am little worried about problems. The only dealer is miles away from me. >Has anyone ever bought from them direct. > They will not sell direct. In fact they will ONLY honor the warrantee if the > work is done by one of THEIR dealers. They will not ship parts to ANY customer. > They will not ship parts to any ol’ pro-shop, only ‘approved dealers’. In fact > you can not even BUY parts from them. They will not even sell you a string. You > MUST buy everything only at an ‘approved dealer’. > Pure b.s.

No, that’s called "protecting your dealers," the people that stock thousands of dollars of product in their shops only to have people buy discount bows from mail order houses.

Response:

> As previously post, then what could would it do for me to learn to work on > my own bow if they would not sell any parts needed..duh, I have a friend who > broke a limb on the second day of bow season. It TOOK 3-4 WEEKS… > thats a long time to me when you spend 600-800 dollars for a bow..thats what > I am worried about..

What’s wrong with keeping your old bow when you buy a new one, in the unlikely event you do have some problem you have a spare to get you by? If you worry that much about what might happen, I would suggest giving up hunting and taking up checkers.

Response:

As previously post, then what could would it do for me to learn to work on my own bow if they would not sell any parts needed..duh, I have a friend who broke a limb on the second day of bow season. It TOOK 3-4 WEEKS… thats a long time to me when you spend 600-800 dollars for a bow..thats what I am worried about.. Yeah, "duh" is right… what the hell good would it do you to know anything about servicing your own bow – that’s just ridiculous. With an attitude like that, it’s no wonder no one has responded to your previous posts.  Look, I was just trying to give you some friendly, legitimate advice based on your post.  If you knew anything about bows you would realize that there’s more to "working on bows" than replacing failed components.  You may want to download Easton’s Tuning Guide or visit Joe Tapley’s site, both very helpful.  There’s also many other message boards (discussion forums) dedicated to bowhunting and equipment repair you may want to visit. Strings, harnesses, fasteners, bearings, bushings (typical wear and tear) can all be replaced fairly easily if you know what you’re doing – a little knowledge and an inexpensive, portable bow press can be very helpful in field situations when a pro-shop isn’t readily available. — Brad Remove broadhead when shooting me an email

Response:

> No, that’s called "protecting your dealers," the people that stock thousands > of dollars of product in their shops only to have people buy discount bows > from mail order houses.

Oh bull shit! Protecting your dealers? Who are these people anyway? I was looking to purchase a new bow, and the bow I wanted was a Mathews Conquest 2. But I HAD to buy it from a local dealer. I could not shop for best price (online) as Mathews forbids its dealer network to sell other than through direct local store sales. If I don’t buy it per THEIR specifications, then I can’t but it. We live in a day and age when the consumer is more savvy than ever before. Their better than thou attitude lost this sale, and future sales from me. Now I know you may say the loss of a single sale won’t hurt the company, but over time Mathews will hit their sales bottom line by not allowing savvy consumers to purchase via the method they choose. And I know I’m not the only one that feel this way. I’m a smart shopper, have done my research, know what I want, and want the best price available to me. To have a company tell me how I can and cannot buy is ludicrous. There’s too much competition out there and my dollars, now and in the future, will go anywhere but to a company like Mathews. Rant over… BVStaples

Response:

How would you like it if you had $10,000 of your own money nailed to a wall [basically what you do when you own an archery shop] and some online broker with absolutely no customer service starts sending catalogs to your house advertising the same product you sell for 30% less? And then, the people that buy those mail-order bows start bringing them in to your shop, to be repaired FREE under warranty? Wouldn’t be very long and you couldn’t afford to keep the door open. So, you’d do one of two things. You’d drop the mail-order product, or you’d simply close your doors and get a job as a clerk at WalMart. That’s what’s happening in the archery industry right now. – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> No, that’s called "protecting your dealers," the people that stock thousands > of dollars of product in their shops only to have people buy discount bows > from mail order houses. > Oh bull shit! Protecting your dealers? Who are these people anyway? I was > looking to purchase a new bow, and the bow I wanted was a Mathews Conquest > 2. But I HAD to buy it from a local dealer. I could not shop for best price > (online) as Mathews forbids its dealer network to sell other than through > direct local store sales. If I don’t buy it per THEIR specifications, then I > can’t but it. We live in a day and age when the consumer is more savvy than > ever before. Their better than thou attitude lost this sale, and future > sales from me. Now I know you may say the loss of a single sale won’t hurt > the company, but over time Mathews will hit their sales bottom line by not > allowing savvy consumers to purchase via the method they choose. And I know > I’m not the only one that feel this way. > I’m a smart shopper, have done my research, know what I want, and want the > best price available to me. To have a company tell me how I can and cannot > buy is ludicrous. There’s too much competition out there and my dollars, now > and in the future, will go anywhere but to a company like Mathews. > Rant over… > BVStaples

Response:

>How would you like it if you had $10,000 of your own money nailed to a wall >[basically what you do when you own an archery shop] and some online broker >with absolutely no customer service starts sending catalogs to your house >advertising the same product you sell for 30% less? >And then, the people that buy those mail-order bows start bringing them in >to your shop, to be repaired FREE under warranty? >Wouldn’t be very long and you couldn’t afford to keep the door open. So, >you’d do one of two things. You’d drop the mail-order product, or you’d >simply close your doors and get a job as a clerk at WalMart. >That’s what’s happening in the archery industry right now.

Too bad. If local business people can’t figure out how to make it work in today’s market then let ‘em go out of business. There are many products available via catalog shopping or mail order. Other industries survive. I see PC shops, tackle shops, tool shops and all different types of businesses staying alive in spite of catalog and mail order competition. It takes work, smart purchasing and thin margins but it CAN be done. What’s all this about ‘free’ warranty work. Since when has a local dealer been responsible for the absorbing the cost of a repair. Why the hell would you do that. If the manufacturer will not pay for the dealers time then the hell with them. Sounds like the ol’ Mathews Inc ‘partnership’ scam. BTW, the biggest archery shop in Connecticut is alive and well here in Manchester. Prices are typically on par with the catalog places and when it is time to move inventory the prices are LOWER. Not 30% higher. Buying smart, stocking smart and charging fair prices for top shelf repairs keeping this place jumpin’. Customers are often lined up at the door at opening time. You CAN compete and beat the mail order marts.

Response:

As a small archery Pro shop owner, I do not mind if someone buys from the Discount or mail order. I  will be more than glad to set up or service the bow at a reasonable cost. But can not due for free, I charge a set rate for bow setup and tuning. If you have a bow problem I will even help you send the bow back to the mfg etc, but will not perform service work for free. I make most of any profit with service and selling the other items you need, custom arrows, peep,kisser, fiber optic sight and other items. I have customers coming back based on the quality of my work and willing to ensure the customer is happy with the end products that were purchased from me.

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text ->How would you like it if you had $10,000 of your own money nailed to a wall >[basically what you do when you own an archery shop] and some online broker >with absolutely no customer service starts sending catalogs to your house >advertising the same product you sell for 30% less? >And then, the people that buy those mail-order bows start bringing them in >to your shop, to be repaired FREE under warranty? >Wouldn’t be very long and you couldn’t afford to keep the door open. So, >you’d do one of two things. You’d drop the mail-order product, or you’d >simply close your doors and get a job as a clerk at WalMart. >That’s what’s happening in the archery industry right now. > Too bad. If local business people can’t figure out how to make it work in > today’s market then let ‘em go out of business. There are many products > available via catalog shopping or mail order. Other industries survive. I see PC > shops, tackle shops, tool shops and all different types of businesses staying > alive in spite of catalog and mail order competition. It takes work, smart > purchasing and thin margins but it CAN be done. > What’s all this about ‘free’ warranty work. Since when has a local dealer been > responsible for the absorbing the cost of a repair. Why the hell would you do > that. If the manufacturer will not pay for the dealers time then the hell with > them. Sounds like the ol’ Mathews Inc ‘partnership’ scam. > BTW, the biggest archery shop in Connecticut is alive and well here in > Manchester. Prices are typically on par with the catalog places and when it is > time to move inventory the prices are LOWER. Not 30% higher. Buying smart, > stocking smart and charging fair prices for top shelf repairs keeping this place > jumpin’. Customers are often lined up at the door at opening time. You CAN > compete and beat the mail order marts.

Gee.. sorry I DE-fended anyone. Guess it’s time I got with it and only bought my lumber from a chain store if I can save a nickel on a plank. I’ll drive all over town looking to save a penny on gas tomorrow, also. BTW,  I’ll remember that "…too bad…" remark the next time you need my vote to swing an anti-hunting proposal.

Response:

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> >How would you like it if you had $10,000 of your own money nailed to a >wall > >[basically what you do when you own an archery shop] and some online >broker > >with absolutely no customer service starts sending catalogs to your house > >advertising the same product you sell for 30% less? > >And then, the people that buy those mail-order bows start bringing them >in > >to your shop, to be repaired FREE under warranty? > >Wouldn’t be very long and you couldn’t afford to keep the door open. So, > >you’d do one of two things. You’d drop the mail-order product, or you’d > >simply close your doors and get a job as a clerk at WalMart. > >That’s what’s happening in the archery industry right now. > Too bad. If local business people can’t figure out how to make it work in > today’s market then let ‘em go out of business. There are many products > available via catalog shopping or mail order. Other industries survive. I >see PC > shops, tackle shops, tool shops and all different types of businesses >staying > alive in spite of catalog and mail order competition. It takes work, smart > purchasing and thin margins but it CAN be done. > What’s all this about ‘free’ warranty work. Since when has a local dealer >been > responsible for the absorbing the cost of a repair. Why the hell would you >do > that. If the manufacturer will not pay for the dealers time then the hell >with > them. Sounds like the ol’ Mathews Inc ‘partnership’ scam. > BTW, the biggest archery shop in Connecticut is alive and well here in > Manchester. Prices are typically on par with the catalog places and when >it is > time to move inventory the prices are LOWER. Not 30% higher. Buying smart, > stocking smart and charging fair prices for top shelf repairs keeping this >place > jumpin’. Customers are often lined up at the door at opening time. You CAN > compete and beat the mail order marts. >Gee.. sorry I DE-fended anyone. Guess it’s time I got with it and only >bought my lumber from a chain store if I can save a nickel on a plank. I’ll >drive all over town looking to save a penny on gas tomorrow, also. >BTW,  I’ll remember that "…too bad…" remark the next time you need my >vote to swing an anti-hunting proposal.

Is your vote for sale? How much is it? Will you take a check for it?

Response:

> Is your vote for sale? How much is it? Will you take a check for it?

What’s REALLY up your ass, Reddon? Mathews bows piss you off that much you have a hard on for anyone that mentions them in a positive light? Or is it free market economy? People’s Republic of Massachusetts? Ted Kennedy? What? Because I didn’t do a DAMN thing to any of you and all of a sudden I’m the Evil Small Business.

Response:

> As previously post, then what could would it do for me to learn to work on > my own bow if they would not sell any parts needed..duh, I have a friend who > broke a limb on the second day of bow season. It TOOK 3-4 WEEKS… > thats a long time to me when you spend 600-800 dollars for a bow..thats what > I am worried about..

What’s really stupid about that, is that A: They wouldn’t let the dealer do the repair on the spot, and B: They [the Factory] didn’t have the staffing to deal with this on a timely basis. Either is inexcusable. But I’ll tell you why they won’t let you work on it yourself… LIABILITY. You put the bow in a press and manage to break the riser and it brains you. Your Mom gets a lawyer and sues, and wins. No more bow manufacturer. Sure, they have product liability insurance, but given as the attitude in Washington toward product liability is immensely anal, thanks to Firestone, they probably wouldn’t last long.

Response:

One of the primary laws of business, if not the primary law, is that the seller must try to get the highest possible price for his product and the buyer is just as obligated to get the lowest possible price.  If the price is arbitrarily fixed by the seller, the buyer is obligated to look elsewhere.  Any other action will result in an upward price spiral.  If I find a product that I really want and the price is not controlled by market demands, I will find a way to get around the limitation or buy an equivalent product that meets my needs.  With the internet as a source, I have almost always been able to find what I consider to be the best price for most anything.  I will usually go to my dealer to see how close he can get to that price.  If he can get to within say 10% of the on-line price, I will buy from him.  If he believes he has a locked in situation and will not deal, I buy from the web.  Don’t give me the support your local dealer stuff.  He is in business to make as good a living as he can.  He is not in business to please me any more than he has to maintain a customer base. Just economics.——PJ  There’s too much competition out there and my dollars, now – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> and in the future, will go anywhere but to a company like Mathews. > Rant over… > BVStaples

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