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bow arm

Question:

Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a compound bow?

Response:

> Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow?

Whatever floats yur boat.  However, a lot of very good shooters shoot with a slightly bent elbow. There is some thought that slightly bent absorbs shock.

Response:

well…if somehow I can convince my coach that, it will be nice. I started off shooting with slightly bent elbow for 7 months now and until today he insisted me to change to locked elbow & moving the kisser forward in an awful manner.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow? > Whatever floats yur boat.  However, a lot of very good shooters shoot > with a slightly bent elbow. There is some thought that slightly bent > absorbs shock.

Response:

> well…if somehow I can convince my coach that, it will be nice. > I started off shooting with slightly bent elbow for 7 months now and until > today he insisted me to change to locked elbow & moving the kisser forward > in an awful manner.

Allways remember to question everything. Ask him for a good explanation for his teachings. MA

Response:

  Should be slightly bent – in a ‘natural’ position as if it was hanging at your side. Reason – allows you to hold the bow with less movement, extending it all the way out & locking may produce small movements (shaking). Also may rotate the elbow closer to the string. — Specialty Tech –  Main Boards, CPU, Memory and more… Lake Forest, Calif. (949) 951-7067 www.specialtytech.com

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> well…if somehow I can convince my coach that, it will be nice. > I started off shooting with slightly bent elbow for 7 months now and until > today he insisted me to change to locked elbow & moving the kisser forward > in an awful manner. > > Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > > compound bow? > Whatever floats yur boat.  However, a lot of very good shooters shoot > with a slightly bent elbow. There is some thought that slightly bent > absorbs shock.

Response:

Think of it this way. Stand and relax with your arms by your side. Now lift bow arm to your shoulder height without extending your elbow. Notice that slight bend in the elbow ? Now just rotate your wrist to hold the riser of the bow.. That "should" work best but all archers are different. And it gives a little room for short Brace-Height bows to keep string from hitting forearm. One of my mentors showed me this trick and my field scores went from teens into the 520’s in a Field Round. Hope it works for you too !

Response:

Depends what feels good to you, and produces the tightest groups. The best advice I’ve seen is to try it with a straight arm, a bent arm and a very bent arm and see what gets you good groups. When I say "very bent" I mean reducing your draw length by somewhere on the order of 3 or more inches… Take a look at pictures of Dejan Sitar (2001 world champion) for an example of the "very bent" arm… – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text – > Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow?

Response:

> Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow?

I’ve gone through my pics from Las Vegas this year and I have to say a majority of the compound shooters shoot with a slightly bent arm and there were certainly a number of very good shooters.

Response:

slightly bent and you should be relaxed

Response:

> well…if somehow I can convince my coach that, it will be nice. > I started off shooting with slightly bent elbow for 7 months now and until > today he insisted me to change to locked elbow & moving the kisser forward > in an awful manner.

I think it’s MORE important to be comfortable. I shoot with my elbow just out a tad, but know others who find it uncomforable and don’t. We ALL have around the same scores week to week, so I’d say shoot the way you want to. Fred

Response:

>Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a >compound bow?

Locked for me. Locked with an open hand. (although with my broken-up old arm it probably looks bent in a photograph.;) Otherwise I had a tendency to push or pull or twist the bow slightly at release time. Don’t think there is any ‘right’ answer to this. Your instructor might have noticed you moving the bow forward a bit at release to compensate for the recoil. Many people don’t think they suffer from recoil anticipation. In rifle or pistol training we mix in a blank load and then ask them why the gun barrel is pointed down after they pull the trigger. Obviously not an exercise option for the archer. For us you must concentrate on what I call ‘follow-through’. That is; maintaining form long after release. Locking your elbow may help but being relaxed and comfortable is important.

Response:

Slightly bent     always!    use a finger sling or wrist sling

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow?

Response:

well…thanks guys, I myself find it most comfortable shooting with a slightly bent arm. I got a tigher grouping.With my arm straight, I find more it more stressful and not able to get feeling I want.

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Slightly bent     always!    use a finger sling or wrist sling > Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow?

Response:

This is an argument that keeps popping up year after year.  There is a simple technique that avoids all of the confusion, is intuitive, and results in the most biomechanically sound solution. Stand with your side (bow arm) to an open door with an imaginary line through your shoulders aligned with the door frame.  Relax your arm at your side and lift it to about the height that it would be while aiming.  Relax the wrist and place the palm of your hand against the edge of the door frame.  You should be standing arms length away from the door so that you are relaxed with your arm extended and hand against the frame.  Now lift your foot on the bow arm side.  This should cause you to put body weight into your bowarm.  Adjust the bowarm position so that you hold the weight with the least effort and most stability.  Now slide your support foot a few more inches away from the door and get the same position of your bowarm and check.  The support for the weight against the door frame should come from alignment of the bones in your arm and shoulder more than muscles.  This is the position that you should use when shooting. Whether you call it straight or bent is irrelevant.  In truth, no one ever has a completely straight or locked elbow.  Generally, hyperextension is not good.   The goal is to find the most efficient alignment of YOUR skeleton to support the force of the draw with the least muscle effort possible.  This is the foundation of good shooting. Too many coaches and shooters cling to terminology and techniques that confuse and are not always effective because that’s what they were taught. Good common sense and a very basic understanding of physics and biomechanics usually leads to simple solutions. FYI, my credeitials are a B.S. in Kinesiology, M.S. in motor behavior with emphasis in biomechanics, former Sport Science consultant to the NAA coaches committee, former member of the USOC and NAA Sport Science Committees, and 20 years of archery experience. Leonard G. Caillouet

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Should the elbow of the bow arm be locked or slightly bent shooting a > compound bow? > Whatever floats yur boat.  However, a lot of very good shooters shoot > with a slightly bent elbow. There is some thought that slightly bent > absorbs shock.

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