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Aiming woes?

Question:

Hi, I’m a beginner in archery using a recurve bow (provided by the indoor archery center). The bow I’m using doesn’t have a clicker or a sight ring, so how am I going to aim at the target? The person at the archery center told me to position the nock infront of the eye and shoot. Is this correct? I’ve only seen people positioning the nock near the chin area. But they have sight ring. I can’t seem to improve my aim, it keep going around the gold target. This is begining to frustrate me. Anyone please help me to aim properly using a recurve bow with no sight ring. Thanks in advance. WT

Response:

There are a number of ways of aiming when shooting barebow (i.e. with no sight). The basic principle is that you use the point of the arrow as the aiming pin (for want of a better word). With barebow shooting you will also usually place all your drawing fingers under the nock rather than one above and two under. One method of aiming is to gap shoot in order to get the arrows hitting where you want. Gap shooting is the process of seeing where an arrow hits in relation to where you aimed so that you can adjust where you aim in order to hit the place you want. For example, if when you aim the point of the arrow at the gold and you hit three o’clock red, then aiming at nine o’clock red will hopefully bring the arrow into the gold. Another method of adjusting the up/down aiming is by string walking. This is the process of moving the drawing fingers up and down the string below the nock which causes the bow to tilt up and down and the arrow to fly higher or lower. String walking does require you to use a consistant anchor point for you drawing hand. A third method is face walking. This is where the drawing fingers do not move up and down the string but always hook onto the same point, and the anchor point of the drawing hand move up and down the side of the face. Because of the contours of the face this method can potentially introduce some left/right aiming inconsistances.

Response:

The methods that PhilB describes are also the same techniques I have seen or read about being used.  So, I am another vote to try them. Norm

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> There are a number of ways of aiming when shooting barebow (i.e. with > no sight). The basic principle is that you use the point of the arrow > as the aiming pin (for want of a better word). With barebow shooting > you will also usually place all your drawing fingers under the nock > rather than one above and two under. > One method of aiming is to gap shoot in order to get the arrows > hitting where you want. Gap shooting is the process of seeing where an > arrow hits in relation to where you aimed so that you can adjust where > you aim in order to hit the place you want. For example, if when you > aim the point of the arrow at the gold and you hit three o’clock red, > then aiming at nine o’clock red will hopefully bring the arrow into > the gold. > Another method of adjusting the up/down aiming is by string walking. > This is the process of moving the drawing fingers up and down the > string below the nock which causes the bow to tilt up and down and the > arrow to fly higher or lower. String walking does require you to use a > consistant anchor point for you drawing hand. > A third method is face walking. This is where the drawing fingers do > not move up and down the string but always hook onto the same point, > and the anchor point of the drawing hand move up and down the side of > the face. Because of the contours of the face this method can > potentially introduce some left/right aiming inconsistances.

Response:

Ditto – that’s what our club coach recommended us do (we get lots of beginners being a University club).  I make that 3 votes Dave

– Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> The methods that PhilB describes are also the same techniques I have seen or > read about being used.  So, I am another vote to try them. > Norm > There are a number of ways of aiming when shooting barebow (i.e. with > no sight). The basic principle is that you use the point of the arrow > as the aiming pin (for want of a better word). With barebow shooting > you will also usually place all your drawing fingers under the nock > rather than one above and two under. > One method of aiming is to gap shoot in order to get the arrows > hitting where you want. Gap shooting is the process of seeing where an > arrow hits in relation to where you aimed so that you can adjust where > you aim in order to hit the place you want. For example, if when you > aim the point of the arrow at the gold and you hit three o’clock red, > then aiming at nine o’clock red will hopefully bring the arrow into > the gold. > Another method of adjusting the up/down aiming is by string walking. > This is the process of moving the drawing fingers up and down the > string below the nock which causes the bow to tilt up and down and the > arrow to fly higher or lower. String walking does require you to use a > consistant anchor point for you drawing hand. > A third method is face walking. This is where the drawing fingers do > not move up and down the string but always hook onto the same point, > and the anchor point of the drawing hand move up and down the side of > the face. Because of the contours of the face this method can > potentially introduce some left/right aiming inconsistances.

Response:

The way you described is a good way of aiming when not using a sight…. If however you do want to use a sight, stick a sight on. If you do, then you are correct that the nock of the arrow is near your chin. On shooting with a sight, there are many preferences, mine is this: The sight ring should be a single large ring, with no pins, dots or whatnots in it. Allways have both eyes open. If you see two sights when having both eyes open, choose the sight to the left (for right hand archers). Dont try hard to aim, just LOOK at whatever you want to hit. Some people might say, that you have to allign the ring to one of the colours on the targetface (for target archery), but it seems to me that the body works best if you just let the body do what its good at, without letting your brain interfeer with this. Its very hard to keep your arm completely still. Its virtually impossible, so dont mind that your arm wonders about, it will on its own, with the help from your eye, do the right thing. To people who don’t really believe this I say, try tying your shoelace, and really think about what your doing…. It can be done, but if you let your fingers tie the sholace, its faster and the bow you get is very close to beeing the same as what you got the last time. These are of course just my ideas, and thoughts.. But I reckon if you ask a million archers this question, you’d probably get 1 and a half million different answers. I do however recomend, seeing you are new to archery, that you learn the basics on drawing and shooting. However strange this may seem to you, aiming is one of the least important things when shooting archery accurately. A great coach once told me the secrets of shooting really good archery. Its a three-step process: 1. Pick the damn thing up 2. Draw the damn thing back 3. Let the damn thing go It may seem as a joke, but it really does work. /Jens Fudge, Archersoft www.archersoft.dk software for archery – Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -> Hi, > I’m a beginner in archery using a recurve bow (provided by the indoor > archery center). The bow I’m using doesn’t have a clicker or a sight ring, > so how am I going to aim at the target? The person at the archery center > told me to position the nock infront of the eye and shoot. Is this correct? > I’ve only seen people positioning the nock near the chin area. But they have > sight ring. I can’t seem to improve my aim, it keep going around the gold > target. This is begining to frustrate me. Anyone please help me to aim > properly using a recurve bow with no sight ring. > Thanks in advance. > WT

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